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Author Topic: how does CEGEP work  (Read 1839 times)
Toronto Fullback
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« on: Fri, 04-Sep-09 @ 09:49:28PM »
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HOW DOES CEGEP WORK; ARE THE TEIRS? WHAT ARE THE GOOD TEAMS? WHAT ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS DO YOU NEED TO HAVE COMING OUT OF HIGH SCHOOL?
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« Reply #1 on: Sun, 06-Sep-09 @ 02:35:00AM »
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Think of CEGEP as grades 12,13 and even 14 (career course).

Prerequisites are dependant on course selection.

There are two CEGEP levels.  AA and AAA

AA is comparable to CJFL (junior leagues)

AAA is very close to CIS level. Only 6 teams in AAA. 2 are newly moved up from AA and have only won a
game or two between them in the last few years. Top teams are Vanier, Vieux Montreal, Champlain, FX Garneau.


Ck http://www.vaniercollege.qc.ca   ..... lots of info for potential students.

and  http://www.crc-lennox.qc.ca/
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shauna
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« Reply #2 on: Thu, 12-Jul-18 @ 07:54:08AM »
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Think of CEGEP as grades 12,13 and even 14 (career course).

Prerequisites are dependant on course selection.

There are two CEGEP levels.  AA and AAA

AA is comparable to CJFL (junior leagues)

AAA is very close to CIS level. Only 6 teams in AAA. 2 are newly moved up from AA and have only won a
game or two between them in the last few years. Top teams are Vanier, Vieux Montreal, Champlain, FX Garneau.


Ck http://www.vaniercollege.qc.ca   ..... lots of info for potential students.

and  http://www.crc-lennox.qc.ca/

looking for some unbiased advise , my son is recruited to Champlain and should be starting in a month from now, since then the ontario preps have been knocking at his door, saying we would have approx the same amounts to pay to either Lennox(room, board,food & fee's) or RICC , what is the better option?
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Proven commodity
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« Reply #3 on: Thu, 12-Jul-18 @ 08:06:30AM »
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Think of CEGEP as grades 12,13 and even 14 (career course).

Prerequisites are dependant on course selection.

There are two CEGEP levels.  AA and AAA

AA is comparable to CJFL (junior leagues)

AAA is very close to CIS level. Only 6 teams in AAA. 2 are newly moved up from AA and have only won a
game or two between them in the last few years. Top teams are Vanier, Vieux Montreal, Champlain, FX Garneau.


Ck http://www.vaniercollege.qc.ca   ..... lots of info for potential students.

and  http://www.crc-lennox.qc.ca/

looking for some unbiased advise , my son is recruited to Champlain and should be starting in a month from now, since then the ontario preps have been knocking at his door, saying we would have approx the same amounts to pay to either Lennox(room, board,food & fee's) or RICC , what is the better option?

Simple actually, CGEPS are a decades old proven commodity in all areas of the game and education, and well the fly by night Ontario Prep Schools are not.  Don't think I need to add anything else.
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Cegep
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« Reply #4 on: Thu, 12-Jul-18 @ 08:46:38AM »
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One of the things that I found when I went of to play university football is that there was a large gap in the size, strength, and skill of players from Ontario and ones coming from CEGEP.  This can somewhat be attributed to the fact that CEGEP players came into university a year or two later so had matured somewhat.  It isn't an insurmountable thing for an Ontario kid to catch up to the CEGEP kids but other than the superstars it did take some hard work.  I have always been impressed with the quality of football played in CEGEP and Quebec as a whole for that matter.  If preparing your child to play well in Canadian USports then CEGEP may be the way to go.  I can't comment on the academic side of those schools though.

If you and your child believe that he is definitely NCAA bound then perhaps the RICC is the path you should consider out of the two.  You will find a ton of opinions on this site about these Canadian schools that head south to play, some think it is a scam and others think it is the best thing ever.  That's up to you to research and decide.  From my own research, I will say that the best route to NCAA is not done through these schools.  The majority of Canadian kids that receive D1 NCAA scholarships are playing their high school careers in the US.  John Metchie from Brampton just committed to Alabama.  Awesome for Canada but his skills were developed over the last three years at a prep school in the Maryland.  Trey Rutherford (2018 #2 CFL Draft Pick) came out of UCONN but he played his high school at a prep school in Connecticut.  I could provide numerous more examples but all you have to do is google the names of some of the Canada Top 100 for the past few years and you will see that the ones at the top of the list all went to the US prep schools.  Many of the coaches at these schools recognize the untapped market in Canada and if you get in touch with them and send them film they might be interested in talking further.  They offer all sorts of funding to assist.  If you want my opinion about playing south of the border, if you child was headed D1 he should be playing at a prep school, RICC and other similar schools may be trying but compared to going to a US prep school, they aren't producing the same successful results.  I will also say that I have followed some of the kids who headed south over the last few years and most still come back and commit to CIS schools.  D1 scholarships are just incredibly hard to get.  If money is no option, put him on a plane and send him to IMG in Florida, he will be speaking to D1 scouts in no time as long as he can back it up on the field.

The other option you could look at is private schools in Ontario.  In Ontario we have some fantastic private schools that have incredible academic programs that will help your son get all the educational things he needs for university.  The amount of effort they put in to improving these kids is astounding.  Football is Canadian rules and I would suggest that you have the same amount of opportunity to be noticed by CIS and NCAA scouts as if you attended a regular high school in Ontario, plus you can still play spring/summer football.  Peter Godber (#3 in 2018 CFL Draft) came from St. Andrew's College and played D1 at Rice.  There are other good schools, Upper Canada College, St. Michaels College, Trinity College to name a few.  If academics are a priority, this would actually be my recommendation.  CIS scouts will still notice him plus he has the added benefit of a top notch high school education and creating contacts with some people who will most likely be very successful.  Keeps them out of trouble too because the schools keep them so busy.  There is lots of bursaries and needs based assistance.  Contact them, go through the process all the way and you may be surprised at how much the school is willing to offer.  If I was going to pursue only one option for my child it would be through this route.  There is some positives for football but a ton of positives for life in general.  In the big picture, I care about my kids being overall successful and happy, not just in football.

The final option, if you believe you child is a CIS quality football player, what is wrong with just leaving him in high school, playing for the school team and then playing spring/summer rep ball.  It costs the least and will still get him noticed.  People think they have to make these huge steps to get to CIS.  If you play rep football well, you will get noticed for CIS, that is where they are looking for kids in Ontario.

Keep in mind that being recruited doesn't mean they are the only school that wants you.  My son committed to a school that didn't recruit him initially.  When people showed interest but not the school we wanted, he got in touch with coaches from that school.  They hadn't heard of him but a few short weeks later, they had watched some film, met him, talked to some coaches in the league he played in and the financial offer came.  Market yourself and you can sometimes get what you want.  If one team wants you, it stands to reason that others may also.

I know this is long winded and went into different options you didn't ask about but frankly I'm bored right now and I thought perhaps what I have learned through my experiences might benefit someone else reading.
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shauna
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« Reply #5 on: Thu, 12-Jul-18 @ 09:00:53AM »
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all opinions are food for thought and most are appreciated. We are from Quebec and my son graduated grade 11( that is what grad year is here) and is off to play D1 Cegep so that is why he is not staying in high school lol. But the prep schools started coming out of the woodwork and making decisions in the last hour are difficult, I don't want him to have any regrets going in to school. His goal is to get to University and still play ball while getting an education
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Cegep
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« Reply #6 on: Thu, 12-Jul-18 @ 09:40:10AM »
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all opinions are food for thought and most are appreciated. We are from Quebec and my son graduated grade 11( that is what grad year is here) and is off to play D1 Cegep so that is why he is not staying in high school lol. But the prep schools started coming out of the woodwork and making decisions in the last hour are difficult, I don't want him to have any regrets going in to school. His goal is to get to University and still play ball while getting an education
Go to CEGEP and don’t look back. He will get everything he needs in terms of athletics and eduction. Plus be closer to home.
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Yaaa Baby
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« Reply #7 on: Sun, 18-Nov-18 @ 01:01:52AM »
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Cegep
We create 25 yr old immature men to winners against 21 yr olds.

Cegep
We create little boys. Whose balls haven’t dropped down yet
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cupper
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« Reply #8 on: Sun, 18-Nov-18 @ 02:03:45AM »
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Players from Alberta go and play in CEGEP, the ones that know about it. Time to mature, improve and by all accounts it is high level football that gets players into the NCAA as well.
Much better than not making it through 1st year university like many players.

Trolls are trolls and are nothing but are to be ignored, do your research and talk to people, email or phone them with questions, they will be happy to answer them
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another reality check
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« Reply #9 on: Sun, 18-Nov-18 @ 09:41:46AM »
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Reality check

1.   Your son will not make the NFL
2.   Your son probably won’t make the CFL
3.   If your son does makes the CFL, his chosen degree/career will most likely pay more than the CFL.
4.   CGEP will delay his entrance into a university program by 2 years, meaning he won’t enter the working world until he is 25.
5.   Read 1 and 2
6.   Is he going to university for a higher education or to play football?
7.   Read 1, 2 and 3.
8.   Chances are he is going to university for an education, skip CGEP, get university done at a proper age and get into the working world, because you aren’t going to be making money playing football.

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Cegepers
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« Reply #10 on: Sun, 18-Nov-18 @ 01:31:56PM »
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CEGEP: It's like a Junior College moron, many people go to Junior Colleges to take University transfer courses usually in a much more friendly and helpful environment and to even upgrade some courses they had struggles with. Not everyone is an Honors Student and not everyone ever will be. First year University failure rates are not good.

Guys like you don't know that doing well in University requires diligence, discipline and MATURITY to work hard which these Millenials and Generation Z'ers did not get because they were staring at their phones or playing video games for much of their lives. Their High Schools just pushed them through without real skills in many cases. 

Everyone who plays football knows playing pro is iffy. Every last player gets told that. Your little lectures make them sound like idiots. 

You sound like some control freak who wants to tell kids who are not yours and not related to you how to make decisions and to follow your every questionable word of "advice" that YOU seem to think is very wise.

Why don't you mind your own business and let young people make their own decisions. They might make a mistake, so what. They will learn from it.

It gets sickening, why don't you keep your busy body big nose out of everyone else's business. 
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Cegepers
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« Reply #11 on: Sun, 18-Nov-18 @ 01:59:24PM »
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Since you don't know what a University Transfer course is, those are courses that can be directly transferred to a University.
These programs are in CEGEP/Junior Colleges (so wrong again), a student is not "delaying entrance to University by 2 years" as these courses as chosen will apply to a degree or at the very least will be credited at a University as Options for whatever degree in the major.
The courses ARE corresponding to those taken in first-year university in preparation for a chosen field in university (Sciences, Humanities, Commerce or Arts). Upon the completion of studies, the provincial government issues a Diploma of College Studies (DCS), or DEC (Diplôme d'études collégiales). Students may then complete certain undergraduate programs at a Quebec university in only 3 years, as opposed to 4 years outside Quebec.
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another reality check
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« Reply #12 on: Tue, 27-Nov-18 @ 07:49:40PM »
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CEGEP: It's like a Junior College moron, many people go to Junior Colleges to take University transfer courses usually in a much more friendly and helpful environment and to even upgrade some courses they had struggles with. Not everyone is an Honors Student and not everyone ever will be. First year University failure rates are not good.

Guys like you don't know that doing well in University requires diligence, discipline and MATURITY to work hard which these Millenials and Generation Z'ers did not get because they were staring at their phones or playing video games for much of their lives. Their High Schools just pushed them through without real skills in many cases. 

Everyone who plays football knows playing pro is iffy. Every last player gets told that. Your little lectures make them sound like idiots. 

You sound like some control freak who wants to tell kids who are not yours and not related to you how to make decisions and to follow your every questionable word of "advice" that YOU seem to think is very wise.

Why don't you mind your own business and let young people make their own decisions. They might make a mistake, so what. They will learn from it.

It gets sickening, why don't you keep your busy body big nose out of everyone else's business. 

CEGEP: It's like a Junior College moron, many people go to Junior Colleges to take University transfer courses usually in a much more friendly and helpful environment and to even upgrade some courses they had struggles with. Not everyone is an Honors Student and not everyone ever will be. First year University failure rates are not good.
Hey….Moron, you seem like you are trying to make a point?
Is it that you and/or your kids were not smart enough to get into university so they had to pump up their marks a bit?


Guys like you don't know that doing well in University requires diligence, discipline and MATURITY to work hard which these Millenials and Generation Z'ers did not get because they were staring at their phones or playing video games for much of their lives. Their High Schools just pushed them through without real skills in many cases. 
Hmmm….considering I spent 4 years in one myself, I like to think I know a little bit about diligence, discipline and MATUTRITY.
BTW, both my kids made it through university too, one with a full NCAA D1 scholarship and the other with a full OUA athletic scholarship and an academic scholarship on top of it.
So please don’t lecture me on NOT knowing what university is about.


Everyone who plays football knows playing pro is iffy. Every last player gets told that. Your little lectures make them sound like idiots. 
Lecturing?...who’s doing the lecturing bud?

You sound like some control freak who wants to tell kids who are not yours and not related to you how to make decisions and to follow your every questionable word of "advice" that YOU seem to think is very wise.
Questionable words of advice?
Reads the name of my post, Reality check.
What wonderful words of advice do you have?
Any?
Doesn’t seem that way, you are just lecturing others.


Why don't you mind your own business and let young people make their own decisions. They might make a mistake, so what. They will learn from it.
You didn’t.
Maybe you should read and comprehend your own lectures.

It gets sickening, why don't you keep your busy body big nose out of everyone else's business.
Ya, you do make it sickening for others, why don’t you keep your busy body nose out of everyone else’s business?
Maybe reality is a hard thing for you to swallow.
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SelfHelpMan
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« Reply #13 on: Tue, 27-Nov-18 @ 08:44:32PM »
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Players can go to CEGEP if they want to, it is a good option for some, the world ain't one size fits all, except for rigidly rigid guys like you. 
Some guy seemingly desperate to stop strangers players from playing CEGEP.
US Colleges have many players who start playing football later. Nearly every Mormon at BYU and elsewhere takes 2 years off football to go on a mission. QB Brandon Weeden was 28, Roger Staubach in his late 20's due to navy, many other examples.
Quit moaning, your moans won't change a thing. 
We are all so proud of your kids, thanks so much for sharing your wisdom. CEGEP should shut down very soon because of your points.
If everyone on the boards was intelligent as you the world would undoubtably be a better place.
You should write self help tomes. Schutze
 Huh Huh Huh Huh 
 
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Moaning
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« Reply #14 on: Wed, 28-Nov-18 @ 11:00:56AM »
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Players can go to CEGEP if they want to, it is a good option for some, the world ain't one size fits all, except for rigidly rigid guys like you. 
Some guy seemingly desperate to stop strangers players from playing CEGEP.
US Colleges have many players who start playing football later. Nearly every Mormon at BYU and elsewhere takes 2 years off football to go on a mission. QB Brandon Weeden was 28, Roger Staubach in his late 20's due to navy, many other examples.
Quit moaning, your moans won't change a thing. 
We are all so proud of your kids, thanks so much for sharing your wisdom. CEGEP should shut down very soon because of your points.
If everyone on the boards was intelligent as you the world would undoubtably be a better place.
You should write self help tomes. Schutze
 Huh Huh Huh Huh 
 

Get your facts straight, Branden Weeden was born 1983, he started university after playing 4 years in professional baseball. He was born October 1983 and enrolled at Oklahoma state in 2007, one month before his 24th birthday. Not 28!!!
Grasp and try to find the few and far between examples of US college players that fit your mold.
Most kids are done long before their 25th birthday, particularly in CIS.
In the 2018 NFL draft 17 of the 32 players selected in the first round were 21 years of age or younger. Do you understand that statistic?
They have finished 4 years of university at the age of 21, whereas in the RESQ, they are just starting at that age….do you get that?
If CGEP fits your bill and you want to be a professional student and play football well into your prime, than by all means knock yerself out.
If you want to play football against teams that are on average 2-3 years younger than you, again, knock yerself out, but don’t let those blowout games swell your head making you think you are great and NFL ready. Because of that age you should already have a few years professional experience under your belt.

Ok…so there ya have it, what asinine facts can you come up with this time?

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Wrongo
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« Reply #15 on: Wed, 28-Nov-18 @ 04:59:46PM »
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Brandon Weeden was 28 as a senior as  mentioned in a previous post you missed Angry Angry Andy.
Your outrageous outrage is changing nothing, get your fave school to recruit CEGEP players or american kids. 

Your dumbest comment yet?

"In the 2018 NFL draft 17 of the 32 players selected in the first round were 21 years of age or younger. Do you understand that statistic?
They have finished 4 years of university at the age of 21, whereas in the RESQ, they are just starting at that age….do you get that?"

Very few of those players drafted have fully completed a Degree for a career. They did not "finish" 4 years of anything because they declared for the draft without graduating. Many other who end up NOT getting drafted do this too and are screwed.
 
That is why they never say "#18, Sam Jones, Graduate of OSU", they just say #18, Sam Jones, OSU - because he never graduated, he just "went there" and attended enough classes to stay in school to play football then left for the draft as soon as he was eligible.

So that point just crumbled. They small percentage of guys who make it in the #NFL will make good money but no great due to the 4 year rookie cap. They have no degree 85 of them because years later you hear of them going back to get their degree & finish it off.

The problem is thasat the average NFL career is 2-3 years. OOOOOps.
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DraftAges
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« Reply #16 on: Wed, 28-Nov-18 @ 08:46:58PM »
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Players who have not graduated an NCAA College are called "underclassmen"

The National Football League in 2018 put out names of the players who were granted special eligibility for the 2018 NFL Draft with
college football eligibility remaining

and are also eligible for selection in the 2018 in AT&T Stadium in Arlington, Texas on April 26-28.

There were a record 106 players granted special early eligibility in 2018.

NONE of them had graduated or had been granted a degree which is why they had to apply for "special eligibility". 

Each of the players granted special eligibility had met the league's three-year eligibility rule and each has submitted a written application in which he RENOUNCED his remaining college football ELIGIBILTY.

The players granted special eligibility for the 2018 NFL Draft:

Notable players with no degree:

Saquon Barkley
Sam Darnold - Heisman finalist
Antonio Calloway
Minkah Fitpatrick
Lamar Jackson - Heisman winner
Roquan Smith
and on and on, none of them graduated and many did not get drafted and cannot play NCAA anymore.

Young alright, with no job and no degree, they should have stayed in school 2-3 more years and graduated.


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