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Author Topic: Want to Succeed in Business? Play High School Sports  (Read 377 times)
HS Sports 1
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« on: Wed, 27-Jun-18 @ 06:05:38PM »
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1) WANT TO SUCCEED IN BUSINESS? PLAY HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS - STUDIES 

Don't need to play a higher level

from Fortune Magazine
*******************

Those dumb jocks may not be so dumb after all. You don't need to be on the State Champions either.

Two new studies found that past participation in high school sports helps youngsters develop a host of crucial skills which give them a leg up as they enter the work world and achieve success for decades afterward.

Appearing in the Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies this week, Cornell’s Kevin Kniffin and two other colleagues found that teenagers who played sports developed stronger leadership skills, worked better in teams and demonstrated more confidence.

“Participation in competitive youth sports ‘spills over’ to occupationally advantageous traits that persist across a person’s life,”  Kniffin, postdoctoral research associate at Cornell’s Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management and lead researcher, said.

One study conducted by Kniffin, his Cornell colleague Brian Wansink and Southern Illinois University Edwardsville’s Mitsuru Shmizu surveyed the views 0f 66 adults about their perceptions of those who played sports and those who did not. Those who sweated their afternoons away on the football field or on the lacrosse field were seen has having “significantly higher levels of leadership, self-confidence and self-respect.”

“You see in the business press, every once a while,  stories about the dominance of lacrosse players on Wall Street or the disproportionate number of hockey players on Wall Street,” Kniffin said. “Part of what this paper is getting at is this idea that there is something more there than social networking, something more than people liking other people because they have something in common.”

The second study, using data collected from more than 900 World War II veterans, examined the long-term correlation of participation in high school sports. Among other things, that study demonstrated a “positive relationship between participation in competitive youth sports and several measures of long-term personal success and pro-sociabilty.”

And the 43 percent of male veterans who played varsity sports scored had careers of “higher status” and more success in upper management jobs and those in the trades. The veterans didn’t name the sports they played.

“People who played high school sports more than 50 years after high school still seemed to demonstrate this persistent profile of more leadership, self respect, self-confidence than people who were not part of high school sports,” Kniffin said.

Elizabeth Covay Minor, researcher director at the Michigan Consortium for Educational Research at Michigan State University, was not part of the study but said the findings reinforced the notion that sports have a range of benefits that go well beyond high school.

“Based on the work that I have done in looking at extracurricular activities and elementary school students, it makes sense that sports could benefit students as they enter the work world,” Minor said in an e-mail interview. “In elementary school, participation in sports is related to an increase in students’ social and behavioral skills/soft skills—things like task persistence, attentiveness, organization, and flexibility. These are skills that are valued by employers. The argument that we make in our article “After the Bell: Participation in Extracurricular Activities, Classroom Behavior, and Academic Achievement” is that extracurricular activities resemble classroom settings in many ways such as learning to deal with successes and failures, independence, and role specificity. It seems that the work world has a similar setting and similar skills would be valued.”

Francis J. Yammarino, director of the Center for Leadership Studies at the State University of New York at Binghamton said the studies “aren’t perfect” given both depended on self-reported data and the first sample size was small. But he said the conclusions echo earlier research which has found participating in sports at a various levels leads to brighter future.

“These are all individual differences variables from limited samples so don’t go crazy over-interpreting the results,” Yammarino said in an e-mail interview. “In general, the studies’ conclusions are reasonable but subject to a number of limitations and alternative explanations.”

Kniffin was careful not to suggest the study would lead to a rush of youngsters joining the football team or hiring executives to consider sports over other factors like work experience or a college degree. But he said it may help change the long-held stereotype, often portrayed in Hollywood, that only washed-up losers mention their glory days on the gridiron or scoring that winning goal in the state championship.

“People who played sports in high school–I wouldn’t say they have the last laugh, but you get my picture,” said Kniffin, who considered titling one of their papers Revenge of the Jocks. “They have advantages that accrue well beyond high school. They include advantages in the hiring process and, much more broadly, their career paths tend to be higher status and they appear to donate time and money more frequently throughout the lives.”

*************************

2) LONG TERM EFFECTS OF HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS

Cornell University


Turns out, the process of getting that dream job starts at six years old.

A recent study conducted by Kevin Kniffin, a behavioral science professor at Cornell University, shows that athletes who played youth and high school sports make better employees and have better career opportunities than those who didn't.

 Kniffin's report, titled “Sports at Work: Anticipated and Persistent Correlations of Participation in High School Athletics,” was co-written with Brian Wansink and Mitsuru Shimizu. The report details that in the short term, "people expect former student-athletes to display significantly more leadership, self-confidence, and self respect than those who were active outside of sports - such as being in the band or on the yearbook staff."

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The study also found that, in the long run, "Men who participated in varsity-level high school sports on an average of 60 years earlier appeared to demonstrate higher levels of leadership and enjoyed high-status careers."

Kniffin said the study, which he started researching about two years ago, came about on "a hunch."

"It was also based on research that demonstrates that athletes who play in high school sports tend to earn higher salaries," said Kniffin. "Previous research hadn't acknowledged why that's the case. What this paper does is help shed light on why that relationship exists."

Kniffin believes that the reasoning behind these improved life skills are due to the lessons learned while being an athlete. His paper breaks it down through a series of hypotheses, which state that people with sports experience are expected to “demonstrate organizationally beneficial traits when compared to others,” which include “self-confidence and self-respect across decades” and “a correlation of prosocial and community-oriented behaviors.”

The study begins by trying to determine if sports played as long as 50 years ago could still have an impact on an athlete's daily life.

“The first part of the project, which would end up being Study 2, was using the survey of World War II vets,” Kniffin explained. “Study 2 looked at it and found significant relationships of more than five decades of people who played versus didn’t play. It found that people who played a sport demonstrated more self-confidence and leadership over 50 years later.”


The project also started by looking at the athletic backgrounds of members of Congress. This portion did not end up in the paper, but the data was included in a complimentary piece Kniffin wrote for the Huffington Post.

Kniffin said he was inspired to complete this project by seeing the success of Ithaca native and two-time Stanley Cup champion Dustin Brown.

“His story was one of the motivations for me,” he said. “We found that 43 percent of seniors played a high school sport. It's a common source of experience for people. Sports is a unique as well as a commonly shared experience … Without a doubt, I learned tons of important life long lessons, not just as a high school athlete, but in competitive youth sports, like Little League and Pop Warner.”

One thing that surprised him in his findings was the notion that adults who played sports were more likely to donate money to charity. The leadership and self-confidence attributes definitely make sense when you think about what it means to lead peers on a sports field, but the money donation part doesn’t immediately seem related.

“The explanation we have is that there are certain prosocial activities and traits that are prized within sports teams, and they seem to spill over into working relationships,” said Kniffin.

The idea that people who played sports were better off than those who did other extracurriculars is an interesting one as well. This study suggests that the most successful aren’t always the ones with the highest GPA.


In fact, in the Huffington Post piece, Kniffin writes: “We entitled earlier versions of the article "Revenge of the Jocks" since the findings generally describe favorable outcomes for former student-athletes in contrast with the stereotype that jocks see their glory days fade at high school graduation while others age much better. The new research … does state plainly that people who earn a Varsity letter in high school do tend to enjoy advantages that extend beyond high school graduation day.”

“How much advantage?” he continues. “That's tough to say at this point but it is interesting to note that the one person most would consider closest to being a presidential candidate for 2016 reportedly played shortstop as a girl, knew how to hit a curveball, and, sadly for her, grew up as a Cubs fan.”

“A fun impact of that was several people have contacted me with anecdotes of their own where they interviewed for a job that had nothing to do with sports, but got the job because they had a high school record for swimming,” said Kniffin.

In his free time, Kniffin works as an “assistant assistant coach” for the Ithaca Youth Hockey Association, which is an affiliate of USA Hockey. He believes that the program is a great example of what youth sports can do for kids and wants to encourage parents that there is a return on the investment for supporting participation for children in competitive youth sports.

“USA hockey is an extremely well thought out program to help engage students into sports,” said Kniffin. “While it's great to seek excellence through encouraging youth participation in sports, it's more generally the case that the participation should be intended to cultivate solid-citizen traits such as charitable behavior.”

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Grizz
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« Reply #1 on: Wed, 27-Jun-18 @ 06:17:14PM »
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nice to see a positive themed article on this forum, imagine how the HS experience in Calgary could be even more so with a level field of play
that is what it is supposed to be   
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Team Sports
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« Reply #2 on: Wed, 27-Jun-18 @ 06:50:28PM »
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This is why some parents promote BALANCE in life, they know there are huge health and personal learning for life benefits, especially with high level sports and it does not really matter WHAT the sport is to get these personal benefits if the player/student works hard.

"The idea that people who played sports were better off than those who did other extracurriculars is an interesting one as well. This study suggests that the most successful aren’t always the ones with the highest GPA."

Employers will tell you that people who are not team players or never played ANY team sports are the most difficult ones to manage. Established fact.
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Revenge of Jox
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« Reply #3 on: Wed, 27-Jun-18 @ 09:46:06PM »
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“People who played sports in high school–I wouldn’t say they have the last laugh, but you get my picture,” said Kniffin, who considered titling one of their papers Revenge of the Jocks.

“They have advantages that accrue well beyond high school. They include advantages in the hiring process and, much more broadly, their career paths tend to be higher status and they appear to donate time and money more frequently throughout the lives.”

“In elementary school, participation in sports is related to an increase in students’ social and behavioral skills/soft skills—things like task persistence, attentiveness, organization, and flexibility. These are skills that are valued by employers.

The argument that we make in our article “After the Bell: Participation in Extracurricular Activities, Classroom Behavior, and Academic Achievement” is that extracurricular activities resemble classroom settings in many ways such as learning to deal with successes and failures, independence, and role specificity. It seems that the work world has a similar setting and similar skills would be valued.”




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Committed
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« Reply #4 on: Thu, 28-Jun-18 @ 08:17:13PM »
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this applies to committed players, not those lazy little p*kes on teams that come to practice when they feel like it because those with no commitment won't be committed to their studies or their job either
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