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Author Topic: Where did all of the $$ go for Sports Facilities last 40 years in Alberta?  (Read 174 times)
AwditBucks
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« on: Sun, 08-Apr-18 @ 11:40:31PM »
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Where did all of the billions in MONEY go for outdoor and indoor Sports Facilities over the last 40 years in what was/is a wealthy Province like Alberta? Speaking of auditors 

Oh, look there is 9.1 million dollars (Nine $1 million dollar top of the line artificial turf fields for example) blown by the Calgary Board of Education with poor business practices. The CBE was hiding money wasted on Office space as "instructional costs". Can you imagine what gets unaccounted for in an entire Province? 

A couple of examples right here

1) Province puts CBE under microscope with 'operational review'
 
Alberta Education Minister David Eggen is taking the rare step of ordering department officials to conduct an operational review of the Calgary Board of Education to make sure it is spending over $1 billion of taxpayers’ money properly.

The review, will take a comprehensive look at CBE’s financial records on spending, including the board system and administration, trustee spending, head office staffing levels and facility costs. It will also look at transportation fees, service levels, the functionality of the department, ride times and routing.

2) Calgary Board of Education found to have made $9.1M mistake: Auditor

Changes are coming to how Calgary’s largest school board accounts for rent paid for its offices and main campus, after an audit found improper accounting.

The financial review of the Calgary Board of Education, spurred by parent complaints about busing costs, did little to address transportation concerns but did find errors in its bookkeeping.

According to the province, the CBE spent $9.1 million on office space, recording the expenses as instructional costs.

But under Alberta Education’s guidelines, the cost should have been tallied as administrative spending.

“In the interest of transparency and clarity, we’ve recommended that the board move this amount into the proper category,” Education Minister David Eggen said in a statement.

“To their credit, the CBE was co-operative throughout this process and have accepted this recommendation. I’m confident that we’ll continue to work closely together to improve public schools across Calgary.”

Alberta Education guidelines prevent a school board from spending more than 3.6 per cent per year on administrative costs. The accounting adjustment will change how much of the CBE’s budget is dedicated to administrative costs, raising the amount from 2.56 per cent to 3.3 per cent.

In a statement, the CBE said it is “happy to comply” with the government’s request and is working with Alberta Education “to clarify the details.”

“We are pleased that the government’s operational review didn’t raise any substantial issues,” the statement reads. “Ultimately, our operational practices are sound, with one adjustment to the presentation of lease costs to make.”

This means costs for its administration building are higher than other boards that own their older, less-expensive buildings.

And the costs of the building will get more expensive every year.

With an escalation rate of 2.5 per cent each year, the lease rate will be $62 per square foot in the final year of the agreement, up considerably from $39 per square foot when the lease was first signed in 2006.

Alberta Education said the CBE is locked into its lease until 2031 and there are no renegotiation terms.

Total costs associated with area offices were $6.1 million in 2013 and are budgeted to increase to $7.5 million with the addition of two more offices in the 2017-18 school year. These costs were allocated to instruction rather than administrative costs,

"with the rationale that they contribute directly to the well-being and learning of students."

Last April, the CBE budget estimated a $38.6-million shortfall for the 2017-2018 school year, based on maintaining the same level of services to students as in the previous year.

This year’s final CBE budget, submitted to Alberta Education in June, found the deficit was actually $15 million after using reserves “and implementing service unit reductions,” the report said.

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